Trillium Insights

Thoughts and Insights from Trillium's Practice Leaders

The Art and Science of Finding Talent

The Art and Science of Finding Talent

A few of our clients recently told us that they are dismayed at how similar the resumes that they are receiving from staffing firms look, and in many cases, the candidate’s skills do not match up with their resumes.

It is often hard to determine the depth of skill that a person has when they identify a specific tool or architecture that they have experience with from their resume.   Recruiting firms use several tools to verify a candidate’s technical competence.  However, most of these tools are focused on syntax and developmental skills.

To find the best talent in this tight job market, the tools and approaches that staffing firms use can dramatically impact their success.  As we pointed out in several previous blogs, Finding Human Capital Data and What’s the Big Deal Anyways, there is both an art and a science to the recruiting process.  There are ways to leverage technology to better understand and predict a candidate’s future success, but it is the combination of a candidate’s technical capabilities plus their ability to fit into a company’s culture that ultimately determine the best fit.

Potential versus Production

Potential versus Production

Watson seems to be all over the news lately. From tax preparation IBM Watson and H&R Block, to diagnosing cancer IBM Watson Fighting Cancer, IBM’s AI product seems to be having a resurgence.  I say resurgence because over five years ago Trillium managed projects that successfully integrated Watson into predictive analytic production workflows. This healthcare Trillium Success Story describes just such a project.

In five years, not much has changed, data-wise, for healthcare organizations. Most are still drowning in data and still challenged to gain reliable, actionable insights from this information. More than 80% of the data is unstructured and in the form of physician notes, test results such as x-rays, EKG and MRIs and other medical documents. All data sources that Watson can handle. So why aren’t there more stories of success and less of them about just the potential of AI?

What still makes implementation a challenge are the human factors. While there are the tool benches and API’s to take advantage of the power of Watson to relate data and utilize Natural Language Processing techniques, without the use of proven infrastructure planning and solid project management, implementations will remain beyond reach and articles will continue to be written merely about the potential of this technology to be a valuable business tool.